The Battalion. (College Station, Tex.) 1893-current, June 02, 1998, Image 2

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The Battalion fiMPCIS Tuesday • June Z, i, President plans trip to Houston WASHINGTON (AP) — Wading into a high-stakes political battle over how the 2000 Census will be conducted. President Clinton travels to Houston on Tuesday to make the case for a new method of counting the na tion's population. At first blush, the once-a-decade head count might not seem a front-burner politi cal issue. But the census is of keen importance be cause states receive their share of $180 billion or so annually in federal money for every thing from Medicaid to highways on the ba sis of official population estimates. And, more importantly for political strate gists, the census determines the number of House seats per state — and ultimately either could help swing control of the House back to Democrats or further cement the GOP's hold. By the Census Bureau's own estimate, the 1990 Census missed 4 million people and proved notoriously bad at counting minori ties and the inner-city poor. Five percent of all Hispanics and blacks were missed last time, compared to less than one percent of non-Hispanic whites. In Texas, nearly half a million people were missed. That undercount is depriving the state of hundreds of millions of federal dol lars, state officials estimate. The selection of Houston for the presi dential showcase was not accidental. Nearly 67,000 people in the city were missed in the 1990 count. i Clinton, who will take part in a round table discussion at a community center, will talk about "why it's so important to have an Accurate census," White House communica tions director Ann Lewis said. - While in Texas, Clinton also will raise money for the Democratic National Com mittee and congressional campaigns at fund raisers in Houston and Dallas. . The administration is pushing a census using what Lewis calls "the most up-to-date scientific methods." The Census Bureau wants to count 90 per cent of households the traditional way—with mail-in questionnaires and in-person visits — and then use statistical sampling techniques The Greys to estimate those who were missed. Without sampling. Census officials suggest the count could be even less accurate than it was in 1990. But their plan has run into a buzz saw on Capitol Hill, where Republicans are leery of anything other than the actual enumeration called for in the Constitution. Sampling is of dubious scientific merit, they say, citing a botched sampling test attempted and jetti soned during 1990 Census calculations. GOP lawmakers fear that a sampling adjustment — ora deliberate manipulation of the numbers — could result in higher counts in inner-city areas and other tradi tionally Democratic strongholds, possibly costing them seats. House Republicans have filed suit in federal court to block any use of sampling. "The partisan calculations of political sci ence are driving the Clinton administration's census sampling scheme," said Rep. Dan Miller, the Florida Republican who chairs the House census subcommittee. "Rather than committing himself to do the hard work necessary to end the minority undercount, the president is out peddling statistical snake oil to the public that will add millions of 'virtual people' in some areas while subtracting millions of real people from other areas," Miller added. Administration officials defend sam pling as a sound science and deny any political intent in advocating the Census Bureau's proposal. "This is not the administration plan. This is the plan of the National Academy of Sci ences and the statistical experts of the Cen sus Bureau," said Commerce Undersecretary Robert Shapiro, whose department is the Census Bureau's parent. Manipulation of the numbers would be possible only with "widespread corruption and conspiracy across the country of profes sional Census Bureau officials," Shapiro said. "You can't do that." But, says Miller spokeswoman Liz Hick ey: "Even if there wasn't political manipula tion, it's just such a risky scheme that we don't trust that the government is going to be able to pull this off." Getting his feet wet £*,, . wh • ft* a ^ LW y SSS& - .NT,.vS »T';. -'<k • ' '. MIKE H EM ES/ Willie Jackson, a landscape maintenance worker, stays cool Monday afternoon in the summer heat while working on a broken water sprinkler in front of the Koldus building. By Gabby U.F.O. WgETlMCr •fo M \ G-HT /\NO ahey HAO TH&56 ElACK eyes A HU<v€. CRAN'Um. Art i st's ReNDiTi 0M SO HERE'S WHAT THEY L.O0K LIKE. U mv headF it N IS NOT luOOKS that / NOTHING- V jg&'BKsd 1 1 U-IKE. Campus Calendar taknJ loci.'I mcq'l An I Bu St epl ien BOOKSTORE! m MOKSTORE (C-w Monday, June 8 Study Abroad Programs Office: There will be an informational meeting to promote the Italy Spring '99 Program at 10 a.m. in 154 and 161 Bizzell Hall West. Tuesday, June 9 Study Abroad Programs Office: There will be an informational meeting at 3 p.m. in 154 and 161 Bizzell Hall West to promote the Italy Spring '99 Program. Thursday, June 11 Study Abroad Programs Office: There will be an informational meeting at 5:30 p.m. in 154, 161 Bizzell Hall West to promote the Italy Spring '99 Program. Monday, June 15 Study Abroad Programs Office: There will be an informational meeting at 9 a.m. in 154,161 Bizzell Hall West to promote the Italy Spring '99 Program. Wednesday, June 17 Study Abroad Programs Office: There will be an informational meeting at 5:30 p.m. in 154, 161 Bizzell Hall West to promote the Italy Spring '99 Program. Thursday, June 18 Study Abroad Programs Office: There will be an informational meeting at 1 p.m. in 154, 161 Bizzell Hall West to promote the Italy Spring '99 Program. Monday, June 22 Study Abroad Programs Office: There will be an informational meeting at 5:30 p.m. in 154, 161 Bizzell Hall West to promote the Italy Spring '99 Program. Wednesday, June 24 Study Abroad Programs Office: There will be an informational back,! meeting at 10 a.m. in 154, Biz/rll Mall West to promote:p erso L Italy Spring, ' uu Program. can your i Friday, June 26 Study Abroad Programs Ofiil There will be an informal meeting at 11 a.m. in 154,161 Bia Hall West to promote the Spring '99 Program. Campus Calendar is service of The Battalit that lists non-profit st dent and faculty even and activities. Iteff should be submitted later than three workic print days in advance the desired run date. Application deadlim and notices are not event and will not be run Campus Calendar. If yo have any question please call the newsrooi at 845-3313. The Battalion James Francis, Editor in Chief Mandy Cater, Managing Editor Quatro Oakley, Visual Arts Director Amber Benson, City Editor Jeff Webb, Sports Editor Chris Martin, Aggielife Editor April Towery, Opinion Editor J.R Beato, Graphics Editor Ryan Rogers, Photo Editor Brandon Boilom, Photo Editor Laura Stuart, Radio Producer Anita Tong, Web Editor Kasie Byers, Night News Editor News: Hie Battalion news department is managed by students at Texas A&M University in tbe Division of Student Publications, a unit of tbe Department of Journalism. News offices are in 013 Reed McDonald Building. Newsroom phone: 845-3313; Fax: 845-2647; E- mail: batt@unix.tamu.edu; Website: http://battalion.tamu.edu Advertising: Publication of advertising does not imply sponsorship or endorsement by The Battalion. For campus, local, and national display advertising, call 845-2696. For classified advertising, call 845-0569. Advertising offices are in 015 Reed McDonald, and office hours are 8 i.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Fax: 845-2678. Subscriptions: A part of the Student Services Fee entitles each Texas A&M student to pick up a single copy of The Battalion. Mail subscrip tions are $60 per school year, $30 for tbe fall or spring semester and $17.50 for the summer. To charge by Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or American Express, call 845-2611. The Battalion (ISSN #1055-4726) is published daily, Monday through Friday during the fall spring semesters and Monday through Thursday during the summer session (except University holidays and exam peri ods) at Texas A&M University. Second class postage paid at College Station, TX 77840. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Battalion, 015 Reed McDonald Building, Texas A&M University, College Station,1X77843-1111. Kaplan. Think of us as the first step in grad school admissions. 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