The Battalion. (College Station, Tex.) 1893-current, December 03, 1987, Image 5

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    Thursday, December 3,1987/The Battalion/Page 5
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What’s up
Thursday
SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION: will meet
at 5 p.m. at the Sundance Club in the College Station Hil
ton on University Drive.
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FORUM: Dr. Miguel
Velez will discuss “Dairy Production in Developing Nations
— Facts and Alternatives” at 7 p.m. in 404 Rudder.
STUDENT Y: YOUTH FUN DAY III: will meet at 8:30 p.m.
in 228-230 MSC.
MSC HOSPITALITY: will have a fashion show at noon in the
MSC flag room.
FRESHMAN AG SOCIETY: will have a Christmas party at
5:30 p.m. in the Kleberg Animal and Food Science Center.
MEXICAN AMERICAN ENGINEERING SOCIETY: will
meet at 7 p.m. in 501 Rudder.
S.H.A.R.E.: Applications for S.H.A.R.E. staff are available
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. until the end of the semester at the
Off-Campus Center.
MODERN LANGUAGES — GERMAN FACULTY: will pre
sent “Die Hose” at 8 p.m. in 201 MSC.
WOMEN’S STUDIES: will show the movie “To the Light
house” at 7:30 p.m. in 120 Blocker.
TAMU CYCLING TEAM: will meet at 7 p.m. in 350 MSC.
MSC HOSPITALITY: will have an Aggie Christmas Fair
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the ballroom in the second floor
of the MSC.
PHI THETA KAPPA ALUMNI: will meet at 5 p.m. at
Brownstone Apartments.
REVEILLE V: Pictures can be made with Reveille in the MSC
flag room from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. until Dec. 4.
CATHOLIC STUDENT ASSOCIATION: will meet at 6:15
p.m. and at 8 p.m. at St. Mary’s Student Center, 103 Nagle.
PHI KAPPA PHI HONOR SOCIETY: Applications for
graduate study are available in 219 Engineering/Physics.
Friday
DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT — DISTINGUISHED
VISITING EXECUTIVE SERIES: Mr. James Fish will
speak in 114 Blocker.
TAMU TABLE-TENNIS CLUB: will meet in 304 Read.
DATA PROCESSING MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION:
will have a Christmas social at 8 p.m. in the Ramada Inn
penthouse.
UNITED CAMPUS MINISTRIES: will have a peanut-butter
fellowship at 11:30 a.m. at Rudder Fountain and a Bible
study at 6:30 p.m. at the A&M Presbyterian Church.
AFRICAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: will meet at 7 p.m.
in 404 Rudder.
HART HALL: will have a bicycle auction from 11:30 a.m. to
2 p.m. in front of Rudder Tower.
Items for What's Up should be submitted to The Battalion,
216 Reed McDonald, no less than three working days be
fore desired publication date.
Survey shows
rise in sales
across state
DALLAS (AP) — A survey of re
tail purchases by personal checks
during the long Thanksgiving week
end shows a 14 percent increase in
sales statewide compared to the
same weekend in 1986.
The Dallas-Fort Worth area led
the state in purchases during what is
traditionally the year’s busiest shop
ping weekend.
Shoppers wrote $3.2 million
worth of checks to 2,000 Dallas-Fort
Worth retailers during the three-day
weekend, according to Houston-
based TeleCheck Southwest, a pay
ment services company that collects
data from 9,000 Texas merchants.
Reports by TeleCheck’s clients
show consumers wrote $6.8 million
worth of checks statewide.
In Houston, check purchases for
the weekend were up 7.2 percent,
while sales in the San Antonio and
Austin areas were down 1.2 percent
from the year before.
D-FW check purchases were up
23.6 percent for the weekend com
pared to last year’s Thanksgiving
weekend sales, the company’s fig
ures show. The amount of the aver
age check written also was up half a
percentage point to $97.69.
Those figures have helped fuel
optimism in the wake of the mid-Oc
tober stock market decline that some
analysts feared might shake con
sumer confidence during the critical
sales season.
“Check activity is an indicator of
the direction of how things are
? ;oing,” Ken Wait, vice chairman and
ounder of Telecheck, said.
But Wait also cautioned that the
weekend shopping traffic is unlikely
to continue, noting that the three-
day sales period is usually the heavi
est sales period of the year.
Dennis Telzrow, an analyst with
Eppler, Guerin 8c Turner in Dallas,
said he is expecting a 2 percent to 3
percent overall increase in sales this
Christmas season.
“With inflation, that means 5 per
cent to 6 percent,” which would
equal an average or below-average
season, he said.
TeleCheck’s clients include a cross
section of retailers, such as depart
ment and specialty stores. The com
pany’s figures do not include sales
paid for by credit cards or cash.
Guardroom acts as center
of coordination for cadets
By Ross Elkins
Reporter
)rps
guardroom in the Quadrangle is the
headquarters and coordinating arm
of the Corps.
“The guardroom supplies Corps
members with information such as
what uniform will be worn for for
mation,” Corps Adjutant Peter
Awad, a senior computer science
major, said.
Another example of the guard
room’s coordination is the raising of
the U.S. flag at various locations on
carnpus.
“Flags are raised on the Quad, the
west side of the Academic Building,
and the east side of the System Ad-
ministraton Building,” Awad said.
Applications for MSC committees
and Texas A&M’s Muster committee
can be obtained from the guard-
room. Also, bonfire buddy gifts can
be dropped off or picked up there.
The guardroom also offers an es
cort service for women walking on
campus at night, said Jay Kregel, a
junior civil engineering major and
Corps administrative sargeant.
“Around 10 p.m. is when the serv
ice is used most,” Kregel said.
“Usually female students on the
north end of campus who are com
ing home to the Commons are the
ones who use the service most. Ev
eryone would like to think they are
safe walking by themselves on cam
pus at night, but it’s just better to be
safe than sorry.”
The guardroom is also a center of
communication for the Corps.
Mailboxes for each outfit are lo
cated in the guardroom. Designated
sophomores from each outfit sign in
twice a day and pick up memos, mes
sages, or any other pertinent infor
mation and relay it to other mem
bers in the outfit, Awad said.
The guardroom is the coordinat
ing center for the Corps, and the
Military Sciences Building (formerly
the Trigon) is used as an advisory
unit.
“Every morning at 8 a.m. the des
ignated sophomore of the day signs
in and takes messages over to the
Trigon,” Awad said. “The Trigon in
turn sends its messages back to the
guardroom.”
The guardroom also keeps a
phone list of all Corps members,
Kregel said.
“This is used by students mostly,
but we do have an occasional parent
call and need a phone number,”
Kregel said.
Awad, as Corps adjutant, holds
the third-highest rank in the Corps.
“I am responsible for the guard-
room at all times,” Awad said. “Un
fortunately I can’t be there 24 hours
a day, so each outfit has three days
designated to them each semester.
There must be four Corps members
on duty. One white belt (an upp<
classman), a sophomore, and t
freshmen.”
Freshmen members answer
phones while the sophomore usually
runs errands.
“The white belt is there to oversee
the others on duty,” Awad said. “At
night, the staff is reduced to three
members.”
Seven juniors and 11 seniors are
on Corps staff. These members also
oversee the guardroom, Kregel said.
“Each year we have an applica
tion-interview process to select new
staff members,” he said.
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Texas court takes child custody
from Jehovah's Witness believer
AUSTIN (AP) — The Texas Su
preme Court on Wednesday let
stand a jury’s decision taking child
custody away from a Jehovah’s Wit
ness who testified she doesn’t believe
in Christmas, birthdays or singing
“God Bless America.”
Marianne Rutland Chaisson may
now ask the U.S. Supreme Court to
rule that questions about her reli
gious beliefs should not have been
K rmitted at the custody trial, her
vyer said.
Jurors in a Dallas County court
appointed Lawrence J. Rutland,
Chaisson’s ex-husband, as managing
conservator of their two sons, ages 5
and 6, when the case was tried.
Chaisson had been named managing
conservator when they were di
vorced in 1983, but Rutland later
filed suit to change that.
“The problem is you are dealing
with Jehovah’s Witnesses, which is a
very tiny minority,” said lawyer Mi
chael Sloan of McKinney, handling
the appeal for Mrs. Chaisson.
“They come across to the main
stream American as being strange
and different,” he said. “That auto
matically puts someone behind the
eight ball. They do have some un
usual beliefs. And this case was tried
at Christmas time.”
Chaisson, who is remarried and
lives in La Feria, testified that she
does not celebrate Christmas be
cause the holiday “comes from Sa
turnalia, which is pagan.” She testi
fied she does not celebrate birthdays
because “Herod had John the Bap
tist beheaded on his birthday and
Pharoah had his baker hung on his
birthday.”
“Being that the only two birthday
celebrations recorded in the Bible . .
. were enjoyed by only pagans, to me
and to Jehovah’s Witnesses it is evi
dent that Jehovah God does not ap
prove of birthday celebrations,”
Chaisson testified.
She said she would not let her
boys sing “God Bless America” be
cause “we are not patriotic.”
Asked if her ex-husband could
provide a better home for the sons,
she testified, “He could provide very
abundantly in a material way, but as
far as spiritual things, there wouldn’t
be that much.
“We can provide abundantly in a
spiritual way and they stand a good
chance of passing the Armageddon
and living forever in a paradise.”
According to court records, testi
mony showed Chaisson had put hot
pepper juice on the boys’ tongues
for lying, and they had been
spanked with a belt and a paint stick.
The spankings sometimes left
bruises, according to testimony.
Sloan said the evidence about the
discipline was compounded by
Chaisson’s religious beliefs.
“The spanking, while perhaps
more severe than normal, was not
beyond what the law allows,” he said.
“They are allowed to bring in evi
dence about discipline. That’s a fac
tor to be considered, but don’t
pound her with her religious prac
tices.”
The Supreme Court, without
writing an opinion, said there was no
reversible error in the 5th Court of
Appeals of Dallas’ decision uphold
ing the appointment of Rutland as
managing conservator.
Chaisson’s original lawyer, not
Sloan, failed to complain about the
religious-related questions during
the trial.
In order to raise a point on ap
peal, a litigant must object to the
contested point at the trial. But the
Dallas appeals court ruled there was
no such question in this case.
Friday and Saturday nights (7:30 & 9:45) come see our
Jje.
Starring: Rick Moranis, Ellen Greene, Vincent Gardenia
Special appearances by: Steve Martin, James Belushi,
John Candy, Christopher Guest, and Bill Murray
Directed by: Frank Oz
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