The Battalion. (College Station, Tex.) 1893-current, September 11, 1985, Image 3

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Wednesday, September 11,1985/The Battalion/Page 3 TATF ANFl I £*%£*&* 1 * JTm A Mm* M %JI XAm# r? Engineering workshop NASA wants cooperation AGGIES!— JOIN AEROFIT FOR 1/2 PRICE Aerofit is one of the finest Health Facilities in Texas. Our facilities include: iS >y , particles ientists in- ar system. it withina s neonatal >re oppor- ne of two expensive, ss money as less ex- ■ idea. the space companies a hundred dll be the lote. mrnalisia he Battal- d lor ditors itor ry Oslin n Perry Villiams r Smith ira Bell, issavoy, dy Gay, ;rndon, toepke, horter, Parker, ohsner, th Sury i Adair, h Oates assavoy Basile, Hallett, llmeyer irabein Bailey, . Hada, ■ Lopez ancnez •wspaper &M and se of die arily rep ’s, faculty aaper for y classes day dur- idayand ’5 perse- •ear. Ad- cOonald ion, TX 316. Ad- ' 77843. - Battal- Texas By CHRISTI DAUGHERTY Reporter The government should work to gether with universities and indus tries to further research on a perma nent space station, a NASA administrator said in a speech at Texas A&M Tuesday. Ray Colladay, the associate ad ministrator of aeronautics and space technology at NASA, opened an In- Space Research, Technology and Engineering Workshop. Colladay also said life-support sys tems that are designed to sustain a group on a permanent station are al ready being developed. But engineering and technical de tails are still being worked out, he said. “What we need to do is to pool what resources we have in industry and universities with the govern ment’s resources,” Colladay said. While NASA has been working mainly on the details of the space platform, a group of Langley Re search Center scientists and engi neers have been looking for ways the station could be used by American engineers and scientists, he said. The Langley group is hoping to encourage use of the space station by “What we need to do is to pool what resources we have in industry and uni versities with the govern ment’s resources. ” — Ray Colladay, NASA administrator groups as diverse as agriculture, business and social sciences. “Our advanced facilities serve as a magnet to draw researchers in all Fields to NASA,” Colladay said. The workshop, which is spon sored by the Space Research Center with the support of NASA and the Universities Space Research Associa tion, of which A&M is a member, was designed to get input from Uni versity researchers and students on possible uses for a space platform in their various fields, he said. With the help of universit y re searchers and businessmen they hope to discover more creative uses for the space station, he said. The space shuttle, Colladay said, is just a First step toward a perma nent space platform, but it is a very important first step. “The shuttle is not just a launch vehicle, it’s a fantastic opportunity for experiments, providing the kind of data-base in the zero gravity envi ronment that we have to have to do engineering experimentation,” he said. Zero gravity can be simulated on earth, he said, but in the long-run that is more expensive and less effec tive than a permanent space plat form would be. Scientists and engineers had listed a series of problems that they are working on and must solve before building a permanent space station, Colladay said. He said he would like to see joint projects involving NASA and uni versities where NASA would pro vide the facilities and they could work together to solve problems. “I think it’s appropriate that this workshop is being held in a univer sity and I am committed to the work ing together of NASA and universi ties,” he said. “It’s to the benefit of all three to work together,” he added. “I would like to see all three entities in on as many projects as possible.” School starting for two-year-olds By KRISTY KNUTSON Reporter The Friends United Church has begun fall registration for its Fifth year of the 2’s School, a mother- child program. The program is designed for mothers and their two-year-olds, Hi lary Blake, the program’s coordina tor, says. The program focuses on two- year-olds because it is the child’s most trying year, Blake says. She says the two-year-old child is emerg ing as an individual personality. “The program has been an in credible success and is invaluable,” Blake says. Both mother and child learn to trust new situations and make life time friends, she says. The school is exceptionally good for new mothers, Blake says, because they can learn about babysitters, pre- schools and make friends. Also, she says, the program offers children early learning experiences and so cialization. "Every week there is a different theme that involves learning any thing from colors, shapes, opposites, directions and many other tnings,” Blake says. The first 20 minutes of each class is spent in a mother and child activ ity. For example, if the theme for the day is “blue” and “feeling”, the mother and child will trace each oth er’s hand, Blake says. After the mothers leave the room, the children will paint blue circles with happy and sad faces as an indi vidual activity, she says. Thirty sets of mothers and chil dren enroll each semester, Blake says. Each class has 10 sets. She says the same people are in each class for the entire term so they can become familiar with and trust one another. The school provides support-dis cussion groups for the mothers, she says. Mother’s group activities include techniques for managing day-to-day life with preschoolers and under standing tne conflicting feelings in herent in parenting. Mothers also share personal experiences and sup port each other, Blake says. “ The 2’s School goals are the sepa ration of mother and child, for a child to learn to trust other adults and toilet training,” Blake says. The schools has two 12-week terms each year.The fall term will run Sept. 23 to Dec. 11 and the spring term will run Feb. 3, 1986 to April 30, 1986. Classes will be held on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The total cost per semester, which includes registration, materials and school fee is $105. The program also provides child care for siblings at a cost of $3 per morning. •Indoor Pool • Indoor Track • Outdoor Trail • Weight Machines • Free Weights • Gymnastic Complex • Racquetball Courts • Tennis Courts Volleyball Basketball Dance Studio Aerobics Restaurant Pro-shop Sundeck MORE! Bring this Guest Pass, workout clothing and swimsuit and try Aerofit at NO charge. AGGIE PASS Name Address. Phone offer expires 9-30-85 Aerofit CLUB AND ACTIVITY CENTER 1900 West Villa Marla Road Bryan, Texas 77802 1985 Fall Workshop Registration Begins September 16 University Plus, the complete MSG extra curricular program, welcomes you to the Fall semester! UP has developed through the combined efforts of the MSC Craft Center and the MSC After Hours/Free University Committee. Through the union of these two organizations, UP can better serve the campus and Bryan/Col lege Station communities in leisure pro gramming. Classes are open to anyone over eighteen years of age. Non-students must purchase a $2.00 semesterly mem bership card. Registration begins Monday, September 16 at 10 am and will continue until either classes fill or they begin to meet. Registra tion takes place in the UP Craft Center, the new headquarters for the entire Uni versity Plus program. The UP Craft Cen ter will be open to the public from Sep tember 2 through December 20 the following hours: Monday-Thursday 10 am-10 pm Friday-Saturday 10 am-6 pm Sunday 1 pm-6 pm For further information call or come by the UP Craft Center, located in the base ment of the Memorial Student Center, 845-1631. 845-1631 Song & Dance Beginning Guitar Intermediate Guitar Beginning Country and Western Dance Beginning Country and Western Dance Advanced Country and Western Dance Advanced Country and Western Dance Jitterbug ^ Jitterbug Aerobics Advanced Aerobic Dance Beginning Aerobic Dance Beginning Aerobic Exercise Beginning Aerobic Exercise Beginning Aerobic Exercise Beginning Aerobic Exercise Intermediate Aerobics Beginning Aerobics Arts and Crafts Bike Maintenance Bike Maintenance Calligraphy Drawing Jewelry Casting Matting and Framing Matting and Framing Pottery-The Rest of the Story Pottery-Wheel Throwing ’ Pottery-Wheel Throwing Pottery-Wheel Throwing Pottery-Wheel Throwing Quilting Stained Glass Watercolor Beginning Woodworking Beginning Woodworking *Craft card is included in the class fee. Wining & Dining Bartending Bartending Gourmet Cooking Oriental Cooking Wine Appreciation Wines of Germany **Wine Appreciation and Wines of Germany each have a $20 in class fee. Special Interest CPR CPR License and Hunter Safety Korean Academy of Tae Kwon Do Korean Academy of Tae Kwon Do Women’s Personal Style Men’s Personal Style *Tae Kwon Do has a discount of $5 if students sign up for both classes at once; both classes $63. **CPR has an in class fee of $1.50, both Personal Style Workshops have an in class fee of $45. T/Th Sept 24, 26, Oct 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31 7:30-9:00 $23 mh Nov 5, 7, 12, 14, 19,21,26, Dec 3, 5, 10, 12 7:30-9:00 $22 Wed Sept 25, Oct 2, 9, 16, 23 6:15-7:30 $15 Wed Nov 6, 13, 20, Dec 4, 11 6:15-7:30 $15 Th Sept 26, Oct 3, 10, 17,24 6:15-7:30 $15 Th Nov 7, 14, 21, Dec 5, 12 6:15-7:30 $15 Mon Sept 30, Oct 7, 14,21,28 6:15-7:30 $15 Mon Nov 4, 11, 18, 25, Dec 2 6:15-7:30 $15 T/Th Oct 1,3,8, 10, 15, 17,22,24,29,31 6:30-7:30 $15 T/Th Oct 1,3,8, 10, 15, 17,22,24, 29,31 7:30-8:30 $15 M/W Sept 18, 23, 25, 30, Oct 2, 7, 9, 14, 16 7:30-8:30 $14 M/W Oct 28, 30, Nov 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25 7:30-8:30 $14 M/W/Th Sept 30, Oct 2, 3, 7, 9, 10, 14, 16, 17, 21, 23, 24 6:00-7:00 $17 M/W/Th Oct 28, 30, 31, Nov 4, 6, 7, 11, 13, 14, 18, 20,21 6:00-7:00 $17 M/W Sept 18, 23, 25, 30, Oct 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21,23, 28, 30 7:30-8:30 $18 M/W Sept 18, 23, 25, 30, Oct 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30 8:30-9:30 $18 M/W Sept 30, Oct 2, 7, 9 7:30-9:30 $17* M/W Oct 14, 16,21,23 7:30-9:30 $17* M Oct 7, 14,21,28, Nov 4, 11 6:00-8:00 $20 Th Oct 24,31, Nov 7, 14,21 6:00-8:00 $18 M/W Oct 21,23, 28,30, Nov 4, 6 7:00-9:00 $24* M Sept 23, 30, Oct 7, 14 7:00-9:00 $18* T Oct 29, Nov 5, 12, 19 7:00-9:00 $18* W Oct 23,30, Nov 6, 13 7:30-9:30 $18* Th Oct 10, 17, 24, 31, Nov 7, 14 7:30-9:30 $25* Th Oct 10, 17, 24, 31, Nov 7, 14 5:00-7:00 $25* M Oct 28, Nov 4, 11, 18, 25, Dec 2 5:00-7:00 $25* M Oct 28, Nov 4, 11, 18, 25, Dec 2 7:30-9:30 $25* Th Oct 17, 24, Nov 7, 14,21 6:00-8:00 $17 Th Oct 3, 10, 17,24,31 6:00-8:30 $25* W Sept 25, Oct 2, 9, 16, 23 7:00-9:00 $18 T Sept 24, Oct 1,8, 15 7:00-9:30 $30* T Oct 22, 29, Nov 5, 12 7:00-9:30 $30* M/W Sept 23, 25, 30, Oct 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23 7:00-10:00 $36 T/Th Oct 31, Nov 5, 7, 12, 14, 19, 21, Dec 3, 5 7:00-10:00 $36 M/T Oct 7, 8, 14, 15, 21,22, 28, 29, Nov 4, 5 6:30-9:00 $45 Th Oct 3, 10, 17, 24,31 6:00-7:30 $30 W Oct 9, 16,23, 30, Nov 6, 20 ' 6:00-7:30 $20** W Oct 9, 16,23, 30, Nov 6, 20 7:30-9:00 $20** T/Th Sept 24, 26, Oct 1, 3 6:00-8:00 $13** T/Th Oct 15, 17,22,24 6:00-8:00 $13** T/Th Oct 3, 8, 10, 15 6:00-8:30 $1 M/W Sept 23, 25, Oct 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21,23, 28, 30 6:00-8:00 $34* M/W Nov 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, Dec 2, 4, 9, 11 6:00-8:00 $34* T Oct 15, 22,29, Nov 5, 12, 19 7:00-9:00 $17** Th Oct 24, 31, Nov 7, 14 7:00-9:00 $13** Languages Conversational French Conversational Spanish Sign Language T/Th Oct 1,3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, Nov 5, 7 T/Th Sept 24, 26, Oct 1, 3, 8, 10,15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31 T/Th Oct 1, 3, 8,10, 15, 27, 22, 24, 29, 31 6:00-7:30 $25 7:00-8:00 $20 7:00-9:00 $25 Newcomers House Plant Care Fall Gardening Decorative Tole Painting Winter Wreaths *Fall Gardening has an in class fee of $5. W Sept 25, Oct 2,9, 16 T Sept 24, Oct 1,8, 15 W Oct 9, 16,23, 30 Th Sept 26, Oct 3, 10, 17 7:00-8:00 $15 7:00-8:00 $15** 7:00-9:00 $15 6:30-9:00 $18 All non-students must purchase a $2 non-student membership card when registering for all classes.