The Battalion. (College Station, Tex.) 1893-current, October 31, 1980, Image 8

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    Page 8
THE BATTALION
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1960
ACCIES!
State/Nation
al
Don ^
l o
Jcwe
cloS
\’
Vaught acquitted
10% AGGIE DISCOUNT
ON ALL MERCHANDISE
WITH STUDENT ID
(Cash Only Please)
We reserve the right to limit
use of this privilege.
Downtown Bryan (212 N. Main)
and
Culpepper Plaza
By STARR MOORE
Battalion Reporter
An 11-woman ana one-man jury
found Connie Vaught innocent by
reason of insanity Thursday in the
272nd District Court before Judge
Bradley Smith.
Vaught, 35, was charged with
aggravated assault for the damage
done to the Department of Human
Resources building in Bryan during
her shooting spree on April 28.
Of the four psychiartrists and
psychologists who testified, two said
she was insane and two said she was
not.
Assistant District Attorney Jim
James III said three witnesses who
knew Vaught well testified for the
defense saying she was unbalanced.
Vaught, herself, testified she lost
control when she found she could not
regain the custody of her daughter
whom she voluntarily gave up for
adoption.
Only one of three safety
controls worked in silo
Brenda Rumfield and Pat Arbuck-
le, both DHR workers, testified they
saw Vaught come in the office with a
gun and fire shots.
Rumfield said Vaught locked her
self in one of the rooms until the
police arrived and evacuated the
building.
Rumfield said Vaught had
threatened Arbuckle before April
28.
John
Vote Aggie Elect
B. Patrick
Democrat
ASSOCIATE JUSTICE
14th Court of Civil Appeals
Position 1
Candidate in 14 Counties: Austin, Brazos, Brazoria, Burle
son, Chambers, Colorado, Ft. Bend, Galveston, Grimes,
Harris, Trinity, Walker, Waller and Washington.
James said Vaught wrote a letter to
her grandfather saying she wished
she had killed Arbuckle.
However, Judge Bradley Smith
would not admit the letter into court
as evidence.
★
★
★
15 Years Trial & Appellate Experience before local, state, federal and
United States Supreme Courts
Former City Attorney, Pasadena, Texas * Texas A&M “58”
Native Houstonian ★ Honor Graduate-South
Southern Baptist Texas Law School
YOUR VOTE FOR HONESTY AND EXPERIENCE IS APPRECIATED
Paid for by Campaign to Elect John B. Patrick, 108 Main, Houston, Tx. 77002 Ken Lindsey, Treasurer
Some members of the jury wept as
Vaught, the mother of five, testified
of her difficult life — of her many
illnesses, of her father’s death and
the loss of her husbands.
James said Vaught’s daughter,
who is her fifth child, has been legal
ly adopted. He said two of the chil
dren are with relatives and two are
with their father.
James said Vaught will now be
transferred to the county court for
civil committment proceedings. He
said she may be committed to one of
the state hospitals.
United Press International
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Only one of three major
safety features designed to control fuel leaks in Titan II
missile silos was workable at the Damascus, Ark., site
that exploded Sept. 19, it was reported Thursday.
The Arkansas Gazette reported that two other safety
devices designed to deal with fuel leaks — massive
fuel-storage tanks and an exhaust system — were ren
dered useless because they were potentially as hazar
dous as the dangers they were supposed to prevent.
The explosion killed one Air Force crewman and
injured 21 others.
Fuel began leaking from the Titan II missile late Sept.
18 after a crewman performing routine maintenance
dropped a wrench socket that punctured the missile’s
fuel tank. The crew returned to the control center and
discovered silo fire indicators had been triggered.
They activated the only available safety system, which
dumped about 100,000 gallons of water into the silo —
only a fifth of what was needed to avert an explosion, the
report said. They then evacuated the silo.
Tanks to which the highly volatile fuel was to be
transferred in the event of a leak were abandoned in
1967, the report said, when the missiles were rede
signed and switched to a less-volatile fuel. Also, ini
the tanks were found to be corroding with subs:
that could have ignited the fuel. They were sealed;]
years later.
Unite
wash:
Nixon, rel
The exhaust system, designed to flush fumesfrt:
toward an
silo, was de-activated in 1978 after an accident atil
II site at Rock, Kan., the report said. The exhaust
there activated and blew toxic fumes into a gror
crewmen, killing two and injuring 22 others.
With no one in the Damascus silo, the AirForctt
not measure the buildup of fuel vapor, the report
The missile’s manufacturer recommended it h
alone because nothing would dilute the vapor
cently.
But two two-man crews were sent into the silo’s;
trol center to measure the vapor buildup. The
crew was leaving the silo when the blast hurled tit;
in different directions and fatally injured
Livingston, 22, of Heath, Ohio.
At one point, the report said, the Air Forcej
dered opening the 700-ton blast doors at the topd
silo and venting the highly toxic fumes. But slower
tion of the area would have endangered the heall
residents, so the option was scrapped.
Their security losing appeal
Bonds’ interest boosted
United Press International
Grandparents probably will tuck
savings bonds into children’s birth
day cards forever, but many Amer-
• •
• •
• •
• •• ••
AGGIE CINEMMm
•••••••••••••••a '
*
»••••
»••••
••••*
* i r
•••-
#•••
•••«
#••••
••••*
“FOR
GOD’S
SAKE,
GET
OUT!”
"THE
AMITYVILLE
HORROR"
<••••
*••••
*••••»
toy
THE <Mr L
VMIIYVII.I F.
HORROR
t>,.. i* N
A**'?
OCT 31 FRI.
7:30 P.M. &
P.M.
9:45 ::::i
*••••»
HK<>L IV V VK<,1 »T kll»Df K and ROD F.M.KM
“T'Hl \MI mil |> lb HI ROM'
NOV. 1 SAT.
7:30 P.M. & 9:45
P.M.
RUDDER
THEATER
HALLOWEEN'
HE CAME
HOME FOR
Halloween
OCT. 31 & NOV.
FRI. & SAT.
MIDNIGHT
1 -
R ^
RUDDER
THEATRE
n;M A. COM iNItftN M I ON At PW00UC7 i(
At times it looked like it might cost them their
jobs, their reputations, and maybe even their lives.
REDFORD/HMTMAN
AliTHE PRESIDENTS «jtlf
ROBERT REDFORD/DUSTIN HOFFMAN ALLTHE PRESIDENT S MEN
Starring JACK WARDEN Special appearance by MARTIN BALSAM.
HAL HOLBROOK and JASON ROBARDS as Ben Bradlee
Screenplay by WILLIAM GOLDMAN • Muse by DAVID SHIRE
Based on the book by CARL BERNSTEIN and BOB WOODWARD
Produced by WALTER COBLENZ • Directed by ALAN J PAKULA
A Wildwood Enterprises Production • A Robert Redtord - Alan J. Pakula Film
* CJawanm R';o\fMuNir.A!ioNs::OMPAr*v
"ALL THE
PRESIDENT'S
*••••<
••••#<
MEN'
NOV. 2
SUNDAY
7:30 P.M.
RUDDER
THEATRE
ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE MON.-FRI. 9 P.M.
Dennis Ivey's
Lakeview Club
The Very Best In Country-Western Music and Dancing"
Set
Thursday Wight
LONE STAR
DRAFT REER!
Cover $3X10 Men
$14)0 Ladies
Music By Dennis Ivey
& The Waymen
Saturday Night
Dennis Ivey & The Waymen
$3.00 Cover — $24)0 Pitchers Lone Star
Come Get Acquainted With
Of Amarillo,
Our Mehcnaical Bucking Bull.
3 miles north on Tabor Road
off the East Bypass
icans consider U. S. bonds a bad busi
ness deal. And they say one percent
higher interest, starting Saturday,
won’t make much difference.
“You can get more interest at the
bank,” said Mabel Hill, a semi-
retired sales clerk from Caseyville,
m.
“Government bonds are one of the
worst things you can put your money
in,” says Ken Elliot, 56, of Provi
dence, R.I., who saves gold and
silver.
“It’s a rip-off,” said a 36-year-old
New York author. “Once again the
little guy gets the worst of the deal.
The government has raised the rate
on savings bonds, but it is still far
below what they pay banks and cor
porations. Why can’t they give the
small saver the same amount of in
terest?”
The one percent interest hike on
government bonds and notes — now
yielding seven percent maximum —
and another one percent increase
that could come as early as May
1981, has been touted as help for the
small saver and a way to increase
bond sales. But the government
mainly wants to persuade people not
to sell the bonds they already own.
Due to high market interest rates,
Americans cashed in $7.7 billion
worth of bonds last year.
The tactic may succeed in stem
ming redemptions, but some of the
people who bought bonds in the past
for patriotic reasons say they
wouldn’t do it today.
Retired machine repairman
Andrew Gonzales, 68, of Albuquer
que, N.M., bought 100 savings
bonds during the past 20 yean
plans to keep the ones he
office, say
in conduct
1972 and
linked to i
Nixon '
federal c<
and told a.
gated auth
duct such
Testifyi
mer FBI <
1970 he ay
plan for w
includinj
domestic
He told
plan wher
Hoover ol
made clea
bid the !
further hr
He test
the six-an<
W. Mark!
ler, the F
No. 3 mei
ing nine il
bilen
about five years ago he quit It
them, and not because of the int
rates. ,
“I had bought them as an inti/ «
ment in the country and I havijU | f
lost faith in the government,’’®
les said. “I won’t buy anymortfc United
matter what the interest is ’’ MIAMI —
“I bought them during World ^ Preside
II,” said C.B. Johnson, a Sani; 1°^ Nica
cisco sculptor. “Everybody did w'suliary of
the rates have been too low
He said raising the rates would
more bonds, but only if “they
them enough to compete wit
terest rates from other sources
or two percent isn’t going to d;
I’m not going to buy them.’’
Some Americans, however,
buy bonds regardless.
In Campti, La., Gus Brouss
for 27 years the manager ofCity
and Trust Co., says higher in
rates will not affect bond salesu 1,-
town of 1,100. j ^ ur p ,u ;
“Most people I sell bonds tor moza ,
middle income and have itf Use ,
buying bonds for years,” he 0r 7 t iat s ‘
“They buy for their grandchildrafp
for a birthday.”
And for another large group
Americans, even if the interests
doubled, they don’t have any ms
left over to put aside. f| n ^
“Savings bonds? Are you jobi**3 UI
asked Dan Martino, a 37-year-
driving instructor from Wara; Unitei
R.I. “I have three daughters and: ATLANT
me tell you it’s hard, very hard^phylococi
save a penny. Savings bonds aretM in the !
last thing on my mind.” ;u re of tox
Medical res<
tcompan
dnesday.
e book a
itration of 1
ign, then
serve Nic
West
pany wi
dy manuf
after ht
servative
8, said G
>r the publi
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INC.
IF YOU’RE NOT IN TECHNOLOGY YET, THINK IT OVER.
IF YOU ARE IN TECHNOLOGY, TALK TO TEXAS INSTRUMENTS.
ANNOUNCING
AN
OPEN HOUSE
AT
Memorial Student Center, Room 212
Sunday, Nov. 2 4:30 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 3 10:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
DIVISIONS TO BE REPRESENTED:
DIGITAL SYSTEMS GROUP GEOPHYSICAL SERVICES, INC.
EQUIPMENT GROUP SEMICONDUCTOR GROUP
GUEST SPEAKER
Memorial Student Center, Room 212
Sunday, Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m.
Dr. John R. Hanne, Asst. Vice-President and Manager of Advanced Technology R&D, Digital
Systems Group, Texas Instruments, Inc. will speak on:
“SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: FOUNDATION FOR
DISTRIBUTED DATA PROCESSING”
Refreshments — Displays — Door Prizes
Dr. Kathi
ual Cent
jncipal in’
jidrome, s
UCLA m
ilievert c
portant d
e toxic s!
several n
‘It may l
[in,” sail
ut he shoi
, he has i
tion of tl
tievaluf
sponsible
p be pos
jdn to de;
Toxic she
recognized
marily stril
women. It
sunburn-lil
occasional!
pressure.
Tampons
tobuting fa
the disease
een remo\
Btanufactur
its inv
ndrorne l
nd 40 deal
Shands
chlievert’
found anew
found befoi
Shands s
any medica
rial infecti
reus, was 1
syndrome,
fection, fret
produces i
finds of tox
turn causes
The toxir
viously was
ence, she s
nShands s
oftheroutii
shock synd
ruled out t
Interviews to be held Nov. 4 & 5, TAMU Placement Center
EOE - M/F