The Battalion. (College Station, Tex.) 1893-current, October 30, 1980, Image 13

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    —foreign students a boon?
United Press International
INEW YORK — Wealthy foreign
itudents, especially those from the
'eloping countries, look like a
en-sent solution to many Amer-
ip colleges and universities beset
/the financial problem of shrinking
illments.
But Dr. Frank Welch, president
incoln Memorial University at
ogate, Tenn., warns his fellow
idents against hasty mass mar-
. „ . rung of their schools abroad just to
leciahy m!; 0
• : it revenue.
“It won’t work,” he said. “It will
statemettifsd to scholastic, social and political
HWaches and possibly even to cam-
1 to ilMmtP v i°l ence ’'
conomicre' conce des that running a
h projp college increasingly is more
i actions"If ruIin ' n *’ a ^ usiness — y° u have
’ I keep building up sales volume,
,e. recruiting students,
protitabitpijg foreign student market is
itious retot^y t 0cu lti va te, perhaps too easy,”
cars and to “because so many of the
(ireigners want good business
ler the goyjfces and even small American
ifflictingtl!j|eges can provide more of those
lan anything Europe can offer.”
ivity, exca ^clch has nothing against recruit-
industrvwJ forei 8 n students P er se - He is
imnnrtpd tPg it himself, mainly in Taiwan —
obedealliT^ * ias an a ff i hation with a
women’s college there — and Japan,
and he thinks 75 percent of Amer
ica’s colleges and universities will be
forced to do it within three years.
But he said LMU has had a few
bad experiences with foreign stu
dents that convinced him recruiting
and keeping them in school demands
careful planning, much selectivity
and a high degree of cooperation be
tween the school and the people of
the local community.
“We had a couple of rich Iranians
who expected LMU professors to
kow-tow to them because of their
social position the way teachers poss
ibly did in their homeland,” Welch
said. “They didn’t bother to learn
English well and were insulted when
they got failing grades in consequ
ence.”
Then there was the unfortunate
attitude of some rich students from
one of the new African republics.
The hardworking American blacks
who make up 5 percent of the East
Tennessee mountain school’s stu
dent body found them arrogant and
condescending. There were some
rough moments.
Welch found that having a sub
stantial number of foreign students
raises problems that should be plan
ned for. They often don’t like Amer
ican food or dormitory rules. They
have no place to go on holidays and
sometimes they show a precon
ceived hostility to everything Amer
ican that prevents them from being
accepted either on campus or in the
community.
There are financial frauds; false
claims by students of having scholar
ship grants from their governments
back home, and some of the govern
ments don’t pay the college bills they
have agreed to pay just out of
bureaucratic incompetence.
All this leads Welch to suspect that
those colleges which are considering
recruiting 20 to 25 percent of their
student bodies abroad are asking for
serious trouble.
“I think 5 percent is about the safe
top limit,” he said. “You can’t take
care of the linguistic, living and other
special needs of a higher percen
tage.”
He also concluded that the small
college is unwise to recruit or even
accept many students from countries
whose governments and societies are
unfriendly to the United States.
“If a foreign student has an anti-
American bias, college life in Amer
ica is more likely to reinforce that
bias than to dissipate it,” he said.
THE BATTALION Page 13
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1980
Soviets accused of
milking resources
United Press International
PESHAWAR, Pakistan — The Soviet Union is bleeding Afghanistan
of its natural gas and other resources, a group of former high-ranking
Afghan officials said Wednesday.
The officials, who fled to the Pakistani border town of Peshawar in
recent weeks, said the Soviets are taking large quantities of natural gas,
fertilizer, cement and other Afghan goods but paying only a fraction of
their real value.
“They are treating our resources as if they belonged to Russia, ” said a
former Planning Ministry official. “Perhaps the Western world will
take that as a signal of their intentions.”
The officials also said Afghanistan’s gross national product has fallen
more than 70 percent in the last year and the government has printed
millions of dollars worth of currency to pay the salaries of the nation’s
bureaucracy.
Work on all development projects has halted completely and
industrial production has been reduced by about 80 percent, they
said.
Soviet tanks surround the Khoja Gogerdak and Jar Qudugh gas fields
in Jauze Jang Province, about 18 miles from the Soviet border, the
officials said. Soviet personnel have controlled the output from the two
fields since the arrival of an estimated 85,000 Soviet troops last De
cember.
“They do not even let us examine our own records so we don’t know
exactly how much gas Afghanistan actually produces,” said a former
official of the Ministry of Mines and Industries in Kabul.
The officials estimated production from the fields, which were sur
veyed and mined by the Soviets, at 2.3 billion cubic meters per year.
Since Moscow’s takeover, the fields have become sabotage targets
for Moslem guerrillas fighting Soviet and Afghan government troops.
uited Staltil
azi
Curse blamed for presidential deaths
very zero-year president since 1840
ets
red his mti
16 Jews. United Press International
j : NEW YORK — There’s one factor
r n °? :en overlooked in this year’s hectic
Ur ?7 ; Sction battle - the purported
S J i? ro-year presidential hex.
Seve , ,, Ihe last seven presidents to win an
anons aboil: L. . r ,.
, , iction in a zero-ending year all
ies > enyn jj e( j j n 0 flj ce) f our 0 f them
Issinated.
ted in 1951,1 Many call the zero-year presiden-
the Romaiilldeath streak a freak coincidence,
n 1952 anijut one legend suggests it’s an old
He served ipe from an angry Indian medicine
eming boar:
:il of Chi* Tie death streak began with Presi-
ent William Henry Harrison, best
imembered by the political slogan
1 shared with running-mate John
Tyler — “Tippecanoe and Tyler
I”
In 1800 President John Adams
anted Harrison governor of In-
ia territory, then largely inha
led by Indians. He negotiated
„ |, Bties with the Indians, opening
r jew lands to white settlement and
a , nlCri parking outrage among many Indi-
ntoth , e "fleaders.
jroun , , e T^gy un it e d un der the Shawnee
Tecumseh and his brother,
. , .Je Prophet,” — a medicine man
' 0 f e ' L - and began fighting the settlers.
, In 1811 Harrison shattered Indian
eir un en )rces at the Battle of Tippecanoe,
hers were n)
their singllf
tltufoautician
;r pistol at f!j . -m
thescanjIvUUCtCQ fit
/eral bun* « # _
“i* icissorspoint
United Press International
HOUSTON — A 21-year-old
pan has been accused of jumping
Ifront of a woman motorist’s car to
op her on a freeway, then abduct-
igher at scissors point, robbing and
ixually abusing her, police said
Wednesday.
Patricia Marie Janvrin, 21, was
iled without bond on aggravated
idnapping and aggravated sexual
Duse.
Police said the suspect jumped in
Ont of a car driven by a 21-year-old
ntician on her way to work
nesday. When the woman stop-
ed, officers said, the suspect
raped into the passenger side and
ok the woman’s scissors,
investigators said the suspect cut
sfyictim on the neck and ribs with
I scissors, forced her to surrender
I jewelry to buy methaquaaludes
I id then ordered her to drive to a
Jiarby construction site.
At the site, officers said, the sus-
<">. ” ktforced the woman to have sexual
ilations with her.
winning his nickname and fame that
was to help propel him to the White
House.
Later, during the War of 1812,
Harrison’s troops won a major vic
tory over British forces and their In
dian allies, led by Tecumseh, in the
Battle of the Thames in Canada.
Tecumseh, himself, was killed in the
battle.
Legend says that Tecumseh’s
brother, “The Prophet,” then pro
nounced a curse: Harrison and all
future presidents elected in a zero-
year would die in office.
Harrison was elected to the pres
idency in 1840. In March 1841 he
gave an hour-long inaugural speech,
the longest in history. It was a rainy
day and he caught a cold. His cold
soon developed into pneumonia and
he died on April 4, only 30 days into
his presidency. He was 68.
Since then:
—Abraham Lincoln, elected to his
first term in 1860, was assassinated
by John Wilkes Booth in 1865.
—James Garfield, elected in 1880,
was assassinated in 1881 by Charles
J. Guiteau.
—William McKinley, elected in
1900, was assassinated in 1901 by
Leon F. Czolgosz.
—Warren Harding, elected in
1920, died presumably of pneumo
nia, a complication of food poisoning,
in 1923. No autopsy was performed
and the exact cause of death is un
known.
—Franklin Roosevelt, elected to a
third term in 1940, died of a cerebral
hemmorhage in 1945.
—President John Kennedy,
elected in 1960, was assasinated in
1963.
The Gift That Says
“FOREVER”
Pulsar Quartz
Orphanages closed,
missionaries ousted
United Press International
EL PASO — Mexican immigra
tion officials have ordered three
Americans out of Mexico for operat
ing unlicensed orphanages.
The men were held four nights in a
cramped, dark detention cell. They
were released Monday and warned
not to return to Mexico.
Pat Zullo and Daniel Atwood, who
work for Native Missions, Inc. of Jo
plin, Mo., a nondenominational
organization, were taken into cus
tody late Thursday for operating an
unlicensed orphanage near Zara-
gosa.
Clay Claibourne, who operates
the Casa de Refugios (House of Re
fuge), in Juarez, was taken into cus
tody when he went to visit them at
the jail. Mexican authorities said the
m
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men did not have work permits and
only Claibourne had a visa.
Mexican immigration official Jesus
SedanO said more arrests and shut
downs could be expected.
“Mexico will take care of our chil
dren,” he said. “Mexican people will
take care of Mexican orphans.”
Sedano said the two orphanages
were unlicensed and housed more
than 100 children — many of whom
he claimed were not orphans.
“I know who their mothers are,”
he said.
Missionary workers in El Paso said
the children were in effect orphans
and abandoned youngsters who had
been taken off Juarez streets and
cared for in years past by American
missionaries.
A MUMMY WITH A BIG TUMMY?
— PERHAPS —
Zacharlas Greenhouse
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