The Battalion. (College Station, Tex.) 1893-current, January 17, 1973, Image 2

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    CADET SLOUCH
by Jim Earle
Viewpoint
1
What’re Grand Juries For?
THE BATTALION
Page 2 College Station, Texas Wednesday, January
...
ROBERT HALSEU
A
“Do you think there might have been a mistake in room
assignments?”
News Summary
By ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUSTIN, Tex.—Men could mar
ry at age 18 without parental
consent under a bill submitted
by Rep. Lynn Nabers of Brown-
wood.
Nabers’ bill would lower the
age from the present 19. The
Texas Family Code already al
lows young women to marry at
18 without their parents’ approv
al.
The measure also would allow
boys of 16 and girls of 14 to peti
tion a court in their own names
for permission to marry if their
parents refused to consent. A
judge could give this permission
if he found marriage would be in
the couple’s best interests.
NEW YORK—A public outcry,
some politics and a little arm-
twisting by Madison Square Gar
den officials assured “The Star
Spangled Banner” of a place on
the Olympic Invitational track
program Feb. 16.
Meet director Jesse Abramson
was quoted Monday as saying his
committee had decided to drop
the national anthem because some
athletes show disrespect for it.
Later, he said the committee had
agreed only to consider it.
NEW HAVEN, Conn. — An
agreement has. been reached in
U.S. District Court that will allow
limited competition between girl
and boy athletes in non-contact
high school sports events in Con
necticut.
The Connecticut Interscholastic
Athletic Conference agreed Mon
day to amend its regulations ef
fective in March so that girls can
compete with boys in a variety
of non-contact sports where no
team program exists for young
women. Existing CIAC rules,
which govern competition in high
school sports, prohibit schools
that allow girls to compete from
taking part in conference-sanc
tioned events.
MANAGUA, Nicaragua—Hous
ton Baptist College and the Bay
lor College of Medicine have of
fered 100 scholarships for Nica
raguans to study medicine, Nica
ragua’s strongman Gen. Avnasta-
sio Somoza announced Tuesday.
The scholarships represent a
cost of $600,000.
By BILL SONN
The Nixon Administration is
using the judicial system to gather
political intelligence about left-
wing groups and individuals, ac
cording to the National Lawyers
Guild. Members of the Guild’s
Grand Jury Committee are cur
rently touring the country alerting
people to and preparing them for
the Administration’s latest tech
nique for political surveilance—
the federal grand jury.
Grand juries were originally
conceived as protective devices.
They were to serve as screening
mechanisms which surveyed the
evidence against an individual
and then determined whether the
individual should go to trial.
Since 1970, though, the Justice
Dept, has reversed the original
purpose of the grand jury. The
grand juries involved in the Ells-
berg, Berrigans, and Bacon cases,
as well as 12 other cases, have
instead been data-gathering for
ays into the radical world.
This is the way it works: grand
jury testimony is secret and wit
nesses are not allowed to have
their attorneys present. Recently,
government lawyers have taken
advantage of these factors to ask
witnesses many personal ques
tions which have nothing to do
with the case at hand. The object
of personal questioning, such as
who do you live with, who have
you gone to demonstrations with,
where and by what means of
transportation have you traveled
in the last six months, is not to
prepare a case for eventual pros
ecution but to simply gather data
for government files on radicals.
INVOLUNTARY IMMUNITY
The recent series of federal
grand juries has been run by the
Internal Securities Division (ISD)
of the Justice Dept., which has
worked closely with the FBI in
preparing questions and sharing
data. FBI investigations into rad
ical activities have often been
foiled by an individual’s refusal to
talk, but grand juries can take
over the investigation and legally
force him to tell all he knows.
Information gathered in grand
jury testimony is then fed back
into Justice Dept, computer files.
Grand juries, of course, have
the power to subpoena witnesses.
Witnesses theoretically can plead
the 5th Amendment and refuse to
talk. However, Guild representa
tives say that the ISD often forces
witnesses to talk by “granting”
them immunity from prosecution.
In other words, the witness cannot
be prosecuted for anything he or
she says. Quite often, though, wit
nesses are given immunity invol
untarily. And if you are “grant
ed” immunity and you still refuse
to talk, you can be cited for con
tempt and jailed. Since 1968, al
most 200 witnesses have been
given immunity in this way. From
1950 to 1968, only 20 witnesses
had been given immunity.
In one federal grand jury held
in Tucson during the fall of 1971,
five “immune” witnesses refused
to testify and were jailed for
contempt. The sentence, as is
€bt Battalion
Opinions expressed in The Battalion are those of
the student writers only. The Battalion is a non-tax-
supported, non-profit, self-supporting educational enter
prise edited and operated by students as a university and
community newspaper.
LETTERS POLICY
Letters to the editor must be typed, double-spaced,
and no more than 300 words in length. They must be
signed, although the writer’s name will be withheld by
arrangement with the editor. Address correspondence to
Listen Up, The Battalion, Room 217, Services Building,
College Station, Texas 77813.
Members of the Student Publications Board are: Jim
Lindsey, chairman ; Dr. Tom Adair, Dr. R. A. Albanese, Dr.
H. E. Hierth, W. C. Harrison, J. W. Griffith, L. E. Kruse and
B. B. Sears
The Battalion, a student newspaper at Texas A&M, is
published in College Station, Texas, daily except Saturday,
Sunday, Monday, and holiday periods, September through
May, and once a week during summer school.
Represented nationally by National Educational Advertising
Services, Inc, New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles.
MEMBER
The Associated Press, Texas Press Association
The Associated Collegiate Press
Mail subscriptions are $3.50 per semester; $6 per school
year; $6.50 per full year. All subscriptions subject to 6%
sales tax. Advertising rate furnished on request. Address:
The Battalion, Room 217, Services Building, College Station,
Texas 77843.
The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to the use for
reproduction of all news dispatchs credited to it or not
otherwise credited in the paper and local news of spontaneous
origin published herein. Rights of republication of all other
matter herein are also reserved.
Second-Class postage paid at College Station, Texas.
EDITOR : MIKE RICE
Managing Editor Larry Marshall
News Editor Rod Speer
Women’s Editor Janet Landers
Sports Editor Bill Henry
Assistant Sports Editor Kevin Coffey
Juniors & Sophomores
Pictures For 1973 Aggieland Will Be Taken From
8 a. m. to 5 p. m.
January 15 - 19 A-G
22 - 26 H-L
29 - Feb. 2 M-N-O
February 5 - 9 P-Q-R
12 - 16 S-T-U-V
19 - 23 W-X-Y-Z
UNIVERSITY STUDIO
846-8019 North Gate 115 N. Main
typical, was to last either until
they decided to talk or until the
grand jury was dismissed, which,
by law, had to be within 18
months.
Four months later, when the
grand jury dissolved, the five wit
nesses left jail only to find an
ISD lawyer with new subpoenas
for a new grand jury. Thus these
people were faced with the choice
of either telling the government
about their personal lives and the
anti-war movement, or perpetual
18-month jail sentences.
WEAPON AGAINST DISSENT
Subpoenas for grand juries in
clude no clue as to what the grand
jury is investigating. By law, wit
nesses do not have to be told the
reasons why they are being sub
poenaed. Moreover, subpoenas can
be given with little or no advance
warning. For example, Daniel
Ellsberg’s 15-year-old son was
subpoenaed at 7:30 one morning
and told to appear in court early
that same afternoon.
Also, the grand jury can sub
poena anyone, and quite often
witnesses are only peripherally in
volved in the investigation. But
the government is more interested
in filling its data banks than in
prosecuting witnesses.
The Lawyers’ Guild, in its trav
els around the country, is hoping
to create a climate of opinion
which would force the govern
ment to “re-establish grand juries
as protection for people instead
of engines for harrassment.”
Mat Zwerling, one of the Guild
lawyers on the Grand Jury De
fense Committee, calls the fight
against the Administration's new
tactic uphill, for the government
has slowly been “winning the right
to use grand juries this way to
beat down political dissent.” But
Zwerling feels that if the public
can be made aware of the prob
lem that the resulting climate of
opinion will help restore grand
juries to their original functions
much the same way that public
opinion ended the McCarthy era.
Reprinted by permission from
the Straight Creek Journal.
TRAVEL SERVICE
AIRLINE SCHEDULE INFORMATION
FARES AND TICKETS ■
DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL
.H CALL 822-37311
1016 Texas Avenue — Bryan
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