The Battalion. (College Station, Tex.) 1893-current, May 17, 1968, Image 2

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Page 2 THE BATTALION College Station, Texas Friday, May 17, 1968 CADET SLOUCH by Jim Earle “ . . . You must be mistaken, sir—there’s been no water fight around here!” Proposed Civilian Change Excellent One of the most important programs for civilian stu dent coordination and growth was presented last night by Ed Cooper, director of civilian student activities. In a report submitted to President Earl Rudder, he outlined a pilot residence hall program which would vastly improve the present lack of interest, cooperation, and con structive activities among civilians in sports, social, dormi tory, and academic life. Texas A&M’s evolution from almost an all-male military university to a highly mixed student body with 3,700 on- campus civilians makes it mandatory that prompt action be taken to effectively coordinate civilian activities and to help produce a “whole man.” Cooper cited obstancles to organization which included “dorm daddies”, who instead of planning and coordinating activities, were tied to menial tasks of inventories, work orders, and housekeeping, at a student ratio of 185 to one. He also cited present apathy toward student govern ment, and “sluggish or non-existent” Civilian Council action with all energy directed toward only one yearly event— Civilian Student Weekend. Also lack of any cohesiveness, little effort of civilian students to acquaint themselves with fellow dormitory resi dents, fractional participation in intramural athletic activi ties, lack of interests in school traditions, lack of dorm organization, a weak orientation program for new civilian students, and especially poor communications. Cooper also noted an increasing amount of vandalism, theft and disorder, with burned cards and containers, dam aged telephones, vending machines and little respect for lounge furniture. His 37-page report details the exact method of imple menting a “residence hall” program for civilian students. To a great degree it solves the many problems of an ever larger mass of unguided civilians at A&M. Briefly, it would increase the number of housemasters by four times leaving the ratio of students to housemasters at 50 to one. It would provide councils and judicial bodies within EACH residence hall (dormitory.) They would plan activities, insure adequate communications, judge and punish those who vandalize or violate rules which they themselves have established. Appointment to the councils would be made by all those residing in the dormitory. Maintenance would be improved. Proper study condi tions would be self-imposed. Qualified upperclassmen could volunteer to help underclassmen with their academic prob lems. Interested civilians would greet and orientate new freshmen in the fall. Each dormitory or residence hall would recognize academic achievement among students by awarding keys and special plaques, and recognize leader ship potential with recommendations for appointment on a council. Improve interest in healthy athletic competition be tween halls, and renew interest in traditions common to both Corps and civilian life. Each residence hall would be renovated to include a television lounge, a study lounge, a reception lounge, and office space for hall supervision and operations. Common radio and television antenas might be installed for each dormitory, and an area of Sbisa Dining Hall would be designated for residence hall use for banquets, and special programs planned by students. The pilot program in the residence hall plan would be gin next fall in Leggett, Milner and Dorm 18. The most important concept is that it will work through student initiative and be administered by students and with student approval. Its importance and support among civilian stu dents cannot be over emphasized. Sound Off Editor, The Battalion, College of Science, Class of ’69: I am a candidate for the posi tion of Representative to the Stu dent Senate from the College of Science, Class of ’69. I come from Bellaire, Texas, and am a Pre-Med major with a 2.2 G.P.R. If I am chosen to represent my college, I will work for the fol lowing changes in addition to the regular duties as a representa tive. 1. Set up a panel of faculty and students in each department to consider new courses which might be offered and suggestions for improvement of the current curriculum. 2. Remodel the University Traffic System, in particular parking regulations with an eye to the future traffic problems here at Texas A&M. I have the experience neces- Editor, The Battalion: The “Cadet Slouch’ cartoon of the Thursday, May 16, issue of The Battalion seems to be lack ing a caption. We would like to supply one. Here it is: “I see the Election Commis sion won another election.’’ Jack Mac Gillis ’70 Bob Dowling ’70 CIVILIANS (Continued From Page 1) tive residence hall positions.” Currently, students report that few dormitory governments are organized to any degree of effec tiveness. One reason, they report, is a permeating lack of interest in the student government of that dormitory or that student body. Cooper bombarded this idea with another. “The pilot programs next year are only an idea, a proposal to get the civilian students on this campus started on their way to take the positions of leadership and responsibility they should rightly fully fill. “IF THEY show interest in the project, if they participate in it, the large degree of apathy now found in the dormitory govern ments and programs would leave in the face of an active, dynamic force, which would provoke stu dent thought and action.” Other proposals in the pilot program for next year: —A “Big Brother” program for incoming freshmen. An upper classman in his dormitory would write the student over the sum mer, explaining what his hall pro vided in the way of activities and programs. He would also explain to that student what would be expected of him.” Cooper explained other new concepts in terms of the pilot projects for dormitory 18, Leg gett, and Milner Halls: “One thing we hope to do is to select names for all the halls, instead of numbers. INSOFAR as the pilot pro- Student Scholars Being Nominated For Scholarships Principals of Texas high schools are nominating outstanding stu dents this month for President’s Scholar awards at Texas A&M. Twenty-one President’s Schol ars will be named during the first week of the fall term, an nounced A&M President Earl Rudder. The awards to next fall’s high school seniors are for $1,00 a year to study at Texas A&M. Robert M. Logan, director of student aid, said 1,500 principals have been notified that forms nominating the outstanding stu dent of the present junior class are due by June 15. “We have already received 150 nominations,” Logan added. “They are outstanding young men that any college or univer sity would be proud to have as students. “We hope that every high school in the state will nominate its top junior student so that he might be considered for the award.” The award of $1,000 a year for up to five years will pay all of a student’s required expenses at A&M. To receive benefits, the recipient must apply for and ac cept entrance at A&M, Locan said. Selection will be by A&M’s Faculty Scholarship Committee. THE BATTALION Opinions expressed in The Battalion are those of the student zvriters only. The Battalion is a non tax-supported non profit, self-supporting educational enter prise edited and operated by students as a university and community neivspaper. rhe As jlicatio repuiblication of all otherwise credite J J ~ sociated Press is entitled exclusively to herv oriffin put matter he: entitled exclusively to the new dispatches credited to it or credited in the paper and local news of spontan blished herein. Rights of republication of — * also ited ed 1 ter herein are also reserv Second-Class postage paid at College Station, Texas. News contributions may be made by telephoning 846-6618 or 846-4910 or at the editorial office. Room 217, Services Building. For advertising or delivery call 846-6415. Mail subscriptions are $3.50 per semester; $6 per school r and local news ts of republicati reserved. College Station, Texas. use for not oni all eou (the ers Lindsey, chairm Arts; F. S. W Titus, College of lege of Agriculture. the Student Publications Board are s Boar lan ; Dr. David Bowers, Collegi hite. College of Engineering ■f Veterinary Medicine; and : Jim Liberal Dr. David Bowers, College of ege of Engineering ; Dr. Robert S. d Hal Taylor, Col- Mail subscriptions are $3.50 per semester; $6 per school year; $6.50 per full year. All subscriptions subject to 2% sales tax. Advertising rate furnished on request. Address: The Battalion, Room 217, Services Building, College, Station, Texas 77843. The Battalion, a student newspaper published in College Station, Texas daily ex Sunday, and Monday, and holiday periods, Sep May, and once a week during summer school. at Texas A&M is except Saturd tember througl ay, igh Represented nationally by National Educational Advertising Services, Inc., New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco. MEMBER The Associated Press, Texas Press Association EDITOR CHARLES ROWTON Managing Editor John Fuller Features Editor Mike Plake Editorial Columnist Robert Solovey News Editors Steve Korenek, Jim Basinger Sports Editor Gary Sherer Asst. Sports Editor John Platzer Staff Writers Bob Palmer, Dave Mayes, ™ , Tom Curl Photographer Mike Wright gram, however, we have pro gressed a little further. “Student government personnel within each of the three halls will be appointed before the end of this semester after careful screen ing. They will serve until the dormitory programs are enacted, and the students themselves set up a new election new year.” “These officers would take the initiative in developing a proposed constitution for their respective halls, which would outline elective offices, judicial organization, hall rules, and regulations, activity programs, student club fees, and other needed provisions.” COOPER said the following officers would be elected from the students who have indicated they will reside in the halls reserved for the pilot programs: President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treas urer, and councilmen. “We hope to at least double the number of participants in the student government in the dormi tories.” Appointed officers will be: Intramural Director, Social Direc tor, Publicity Director, and Food Services Representative. Cooper suggested the installa tion of common radio and tele vision antennas for each dormi tory. HE ALSO said that an area should be designated in Sbisa Hall where residence hall clubs and dormitory groups could schedule special banquets and programs. Those groups would pay for the special dining privileges provided. In conclusion, Cooper said: “I am pleased to report that the general approach of this new pro gram has been endorsed by Dean Hannigan, President Rudder, and other members of the University Executive Committee. Last week, the Civilian Student Council en dorsed the program by resolution. The response from returning stu dents living in the three pilot dorms has been most encourag ing.” “'The whole purpose is to see if we’re on the right track for a workable pattern for developing the potential of the civilian stu dents. Bulletin Board SATURDAY The Amarillo Hometown Club meets immediately after the Ma roon-White game, at the South Parking lot of Guion Hall. From the parking lot, members will precede to an outdoor party. SUNDAY The Student A.V.M.A. Aux iliary is having a pet show Sun day afternoon. Registration will begin in College Station. Awards will be given, including one for the largest pet, the smallest, the most unusual, the best groomed, the ugliest, the prettiest, and the best dressed. An entry fee of fifty cents will be charged. Chil dren to the age of 12 are invited to enter their pets. MONDAY The Industrial Engineering Wives Club will hold its final meeting of the semester in the Medallion Room, Bryan Utilities Building, at 8 p.m. TUESDAY The Junior Council will meet in Room 2A, at 7:30 p.m., the Memorial Student Center. Re freshments will be served. Final plans will be made concerning the Boot Dance. The meeting will be short. Nixon Describes 4 New Alliance’ sary to help these ideas become a reality. I served as Represent ative from the College of Science to the Student Senate for the year 1966-67. During that time, I served on the University Traf fic Committee, the MSC Music Subcommittee, and the Univer sity Traffic Court. I feel that I am the best quali fied candidate to represent all of the senior members of the Col lege of Science. Please vote for me on Tuesday, May 21. James A. Mobley ’69 NEW YORK <A>) _ Richard M. Nixon said Thursday that a new alliance of Republicans, New Liberals, the New South and black militants will affect the future of all Americans for gen erations. Nixon, front running candidate | for the Republican nomination for president, said this new ma jority “is not a grouping of power blocs but an alliance of ideas.” His remarks were prepared for delivery in a speech over the CBS radio network at 8:30 p.m. The former vice president said, “Republicans state that this na tion has become great not by what government has done for people but what people have done for themselves. “The role of government is to do for people what they cannot do for themselves . . . open up op portunities, mobilize private en ergies to meet public needs, pro tect and defend every citizen, create a climate that enables every person to fulfill himself.” The New Liberal, according to Nixon, is saying the same thing in another way, calling for a workable form of “participatory democracy.” Differentiating be tween the New Left and New Liberal, he said, “They feel — quite wrongly — that they have to tear down in order to build. The New Left has a passion, while the New Liberal has a program.” He said, “The New South is building a new pride, focusing on the future, pressing forward with industrial development through resurgent private enterprise, forging a new place for itself in the life of the nation. “Its new voices are interpret ing the old doctrines of states’ rights in new ways — those of making state and local govern ments responsive to state and local needs,” Nixon said. Black militants talk little about handouts of welfare, he said. In- If a visitor stands with his back to a fountain in Rome and throws a coin into it over his shoulder, he is said to be assured a return visit to the Eternal City. stead, they speak of dignity of ownership and pride. “The message of giveaway, of handout, of permanent welfare is no longer of interest to people who want dignity and self-re spect,” Nixon said. Clubman Sportscoats 2>on Stnrncn ^ ^ tnene wear Land Is At Your AGGIELAND FLOWER AND GIFT SHOPPE North Gate • Cards • Party Goods • Baby Albums • Invitations • Personalized Stationary Call 822-1441 Allow 20 Minutes Carry Out or Eat-In THE PIZZA HUT 2610 Texas Ave. NEED CASH Money Gone After 9 Months of School? Then see us for a personal loan. Take advantage of our prompt, confidential loan service now. UNIVERSITY LOAN COMPANY 317 Patricia (North Gate) College Station, Texas Telephone: 846-8319 Now Under New Management (Grand Opening On May 23rd.) Campus Photo Center Professional Cameras & Supplies North Gate At Main (Special Prices On Miscellaneous Supplies) rabb/7 it’s IN to go OUT to “THE RABBIT” good college fun DANCING • LIVE BANDS 758 east mulberry san antonio, texas OPEN 11 a. m. PE 2-0336 For the best & largest THE SKYSCRAPER BURGER Y2 Lb. Meat & Double Cheese Only — 65^ Go To “DUFF’S TASTEE FREEZ” 209 Hwy. 6, College Station Also THE GIANT BURGER *4 Lb. Meat — Only 45* Plus Regular Burger — 30* Wee Burger — 20* 50 Flavors — Shakes & Malts SENIORS We do APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS, and we want you to know it. PASS THE WORD ALONG, MEN-best deals buying and selling books-supplies for generation after generation of Aggies. LET US SHOW OUR APPRECIATION, SEN IORS. Come on in one more time, and let us buy your books one more time. We’ll pay the best price-as always and shake your hand one more time. LOUPOT PEANUTS By Charles M. Schulz PEANUTS Vl CAN T TALK TO N /1HAT LITTLE REP- mRED GIRLBGCm IF I WERE SOMETHING AND SHE WERE NOTHING, I COULD TALK 70 HER, OR IF SHE WERE SOMETHING AND I WERE SOMETHING, THEN I COULD TALK TO HER,.. OR IF ‘SHE WERE NOTHING AMP I WERE NOTHING, THEN I ALSO COULD TALK TO HER...BOTSHE'S SOMETHING AND l‘M NOTHING SOI CAN'T TALK TO HER... FOR A NOTHING, CHARLIE BROWN, WRS REALLV SOMETHING! .fr. .. ....